India and Japan urge Myanmar to end violence and return to democracy

0

Expressing their concern over the situation in Myanmar, India and Japan called for an immediate cessation of violence throughout Myanmar and a return to the path of democracy.

Japanese Prime Minister Kishida Fumio and his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi reiterated their stance on Myanmar and called in a joint press release on Saturday for the release of all political detainees.



“They reaffirmed their support for ASEAN’s efforts to seek a solution in Myanmar and commended Cambodia’s active engagement as ASEAN Chair to resolve the impasse. They called on Myanmar to implement urgently implement the ASEAN Five-Point Consensus,” the joint statement said.

The two prime ministers expressed their support for the efforts of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to break the current political stalemate in the country between civilian representatives and the military junta.

“They reaffirmed their support for ASEAN’s efforts to seek a solution in Myanmar and commended Cambodia’s active engagement as ASEAN Chair to resolve the impasse. They called on Myanmar to implement urgently implement the ASEAN Five-Point Consensus.”

The five-point ASEAN consensus was reached last year and emphasized dialogue, humanitarian aid and an end to violence.

Myanmar’s military junta took control of the country following a coup on February 1 last year.

Myanmar’s junta has carried out a brutal nationwide crackdown to suppress those who oppose military rule. Systematic and widespread abuses by the junta, including massacres, torture, arbitrary arrests and indiscriminate attacks against civilians, constitute crimes against humanity and war crimes, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said in a statement. statement Friday.

Since the coup, security forces have killed at least 1,600 people and detained more than 12,000, according to the Association for Assistance to Political Prisoners.

More than 500,000 people have been internally displaced since the coup, while tens of thousands have fled as refugees to Thailand and India, the HRW report added citing the data. the United Nations Refugee Agency and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

The Indian and Japanese prime ministers addressed a host of issues in the elaborate joint statement, including the ongoing conflict in Ukraine, maritime access in the Indo-Pacific, particularly the South China Sea, bilateral economic partnership and sustainable growth in the post-COVID world.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear reader,

Business Standard has always endeavored to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that matter to you and that have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your constant encouragement and feedback on how to improve our offering has only strengthened our resolve and commitment to these ideals. Even in these challenging times stemming from Covid-19, we remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative opinions and incisive commentary on relevant topical issues.
However, we have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more so that we can continue to bring you more great content. Our subscription model has received an encouraging response from many of you who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of bringing you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practice the journalism we are committed to.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

digital editor

Share.

Comments are closed.